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Rethinking the New Materialism for Religion and Theology

Why Movements Matter Most
  • Joerg Rieger
Part of the Radical Theologies book series (RADT)

Abstract

The matters of religion and religious experience are made up of multiple components. In the study of religion, and even in some theological approaches, it is increasingly becoming clear that religious experience is never merely a matter of ideas and doctrines, nor is it merely a matter of disembodied individual experiences or mindless practices. Crude idealism, which focuses on abstract ideas, is insufficient for the study of religion, if not misguided. The same can be said of crude materialism, which focuses on matter in a deterministic way, although religion and theology have less frequently been studied from this perspective.

Keywords

Material Reality Religious Experience Epistemic Belief Positive Thinking Material Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 2.
    Chemical dependencies, for instance, are common and medical drugs often merely cover up the deeper causes and problems of depression, providing a quick fix that does not resolve anything. Positive thinking can create a make-believe world that does not change reality and that misleads people into believing that they have power when they really do not. For a broader critique of positive thinking see Barbara Ehrenreich, Brightsided: How the Relentless Promotion of Positive Thinking Has Undermined America (New York: Metropolitan Books, 2009).Google Scholar
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    Coole and Frost, “Introducing the New Materialisms,” 31. I talk about this in terms of the “logic of downturn.” See Joerg Rieger, No Rising Tide: Theology, Economics, and the Future (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2009).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Joerg Rieger 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joerg Rieger

There are no affiliations available

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