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Epilogue A Typical Battlefield: Understanding Negotiated Development

  • Maurits W. Ertsen

Abstract

Despite the changes in Gezira over the years, Sudanese farmers were still irrigating fields and Sudanese staff was still doing supervisory activities in the Gezira Scheme. Whatever one’s ideas about the correct direction of development, something still happened in the Gezira Scheme of the 1970s and 1980s, even though it would not have been what many people had planned or hoped to happen.1 Gezira became a popular destination for researchers and consultants. Much of their shared interest was on what had gone wrong in Gezira. For engineering consultants, returning to a good functioning irrigation system was key.2 For academic researchers, understanding the failures in development of Gezira—or at least the differences from what was (supposedly) planned—was the goal.

Keywords

Development Discourse Tenant Farmer Settlement Scheme Colonial Settlement Nigerian Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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