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Competing Spatial Networks: Kasimbazar and Chandernagore in Overland and Indian Ocean Worlds

  • Rila Mukherjee
Part of the Palgrave Series in Indian Ocean World Studies book series (IOWS)

Abstract

The first premise on which this chapter is based is that the history of a place cannot be understood without taking into account its relations with other places. Owens argues, “In the new century historians increasingly argue that the history of a geographical place, no matter how large or small, cannot be adequately understood without taking into account how it has been connected to other locations” (Owens 2007). These connections may be social, political, religious, economic, or cultural, and within them are found various subcategories of relations and links. Once connections become structural—in other words once they transform into connectivities—they further themselves through networks. Short, self-organizing, and informal networks show more sustainability than official networks.1

Keywords

Geographic Information System Eighteenth Century Seventeenth Century East India Company East African Coast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Michael Pearson 2015

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  • Rila Mukherjee

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