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The Southeast Asian Connection in the First Eurasian World Economy, 200 BCE–CE 500

  • Sing Chew
Part of the Palgrave Series in Indian Ocean World Studies book series (IOWS)

Abstract

Over world history, Southeast Asia’s contribution to the world economy prior to the 1500s, and especially in the early millennia of the current era (first century CE),1 has been much neglected by historians.2Sandwiched between India and China, Southeast Asia has often been viewed merely as a region of peripheral entrepôts, especially in the early centuries of the current era. However, recent archaeological evidence has shown highly established and productive polities existing in Southeast Asia in the early years of the current era and long before.

Keywords

World Economy Arabian Peninsula World System World History Malay Peninsula 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Michael Pearson 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sing Chew

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