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Changing the Playing (or Reading) Field: Reconceptualizing Motherhood Through Humorous Parenting Texts

  • Melissa Ames
  • Sarah Burcon

Abstract

In June 2012, Star magazine ran a magazine cover in which celebrity mothers holding their young children were captured, unbeknownst to them, in photographs. The headline running across these photos reads: ‘Star Report Card: Best and Worst Moms!’1 Below this are questions meant to entice the reader to purchase the magazine to find out more about how these celebrity moms measure up to one another: ‘Who chooses booze over storytime? Who lets her kid smoke? Who hasn’t seen her son for months?’

Keywords

Postpartum Depression Good Mother Extreme Parenting Fictional Text Magazine Cover 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Melissa Ames and Sarah Burcon 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa Ames
    • 1
  • Sarah Burcon
    • 2
  1. 1.Eastern Illinois UniversityUSA
  2. 2.University of MichiganUSA

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