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Epilogue

  • Joceline Chabot
  • Richard Godin
  • Stefanie Kappler
  • Sylvia Kasparian
Part of the Palgrave Studies in the History of Genocide book series (PSHG)

Abstract

This volume has highlighted the contested nature of memory and representation with respect to the Armenian Genocide in the light of its centenary. Analyses have raised questions about the representabil- ity of violence, the politics of memory, the legitimacy of dominant narratives of representation as well as the role of the mass media in disseminating information on the genocide on the one hand, and its complicity in framing this information to match political agendas on the other hand. A comparative analysis of the media in the international press, and more specifically, the countries of Germany, Russia, Poland, Turkey, and Canada, as well as in a Jewish context, sheds light on the extent to which these acts of violence have been framed in very diverse ways. However, conflicts about the ways in which the genocide should be represented can not only be found between those countries, but also within them, where the media can be said to be embedded in wider local and national power struggles. It therefore becomes obvious that the media discourses on the Armenian genocide as outlined by the contributors of this book are embedded in geopolitical contexts.

Keywords

Social Medium Memory Actor Media Discourse Dominant Narrative Reconciliation Commission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Joceline Chabot, Richard Godin, Stefanie Kappler and Sylvia Kasparian 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joceline Chabot
  • Richard Godin
  • Stefanie Kappler
  • Sylvia Kasparian

There are no affiliations available

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