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Developmental Coaching from a System’s Point of View

  • Theo Compernolle
Part of the INSEAD Business Press book series (IBP)

Abstract

As we have seen, clinical coaching is an approach that borrows from developments in the fields of psychology and psychotherapy. Because the word “clinical” for some people implies the treatment of pathology, in talking to executives I prefer to use the term developmental coaching. The primary goal of coaching is to enhance the leadership skills of those who are basically healthy. Developmental coaching looks for health and the strength to overcome challenges, rather than for pathology to cure. It aims to prevent, rather than treat, personal and relational disturbances. A developmental coach must, however, be sufficiently trained to detect personal pathology where it occurs, address it if possible, or refer the client to a therapist or to a coach with clinical expertise. Coaches who are inspired by psychoanalytical thinking address the sometimes very irrational behavior of their coaching clients based on theories of unconscious intrapersonal influences, such as intrapsychic conflicts, defensive behaviors, tensions and anxieties.1 This is only part of the picture. The developmental coach must also consider the very influential interpersonal influences that codetermine the behavior of executives, even when the executive is unaware of them.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa System Point Circular Causality Executive Team Reckless Behavior 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Theo Compernolle 2016

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  • Theo Compernolle

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