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Language Politics in Canada and the United States

  • Michael A. Morris

Abstract

The contemporary tension between the role and influence of French and English in Canada and how this relates to the United States has been portrayed as the latest stage in a centuries-long struggle dating back to French-English competition for political and linguistic primacy in Europe.1 The focus here is on the contemporary context of North American language politics, but the historical legacy of global language politics in the area is relevant. For example, from their founding, both Canada and Mexico were concerned that their national independence might be threatened by the US doctrine of manifest destiny, and this contributed to the long-standing concern of both countries about sustaining distinctive national identities while being bordered by a much stronger country.2

Keywords

Language Policy Regional Integration Spanish Language Bilingual Education French Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Michael A. Morris 2016

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  • Michael A. Morris

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