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The Broad Background to Secondary School Education in Ireland, 1922–1962

  • Tom O’Donoghue
  • Judith Harford

Abstract

This chapter sketches out the broad background to secondary school education in Ireland from 1922 to 1967, so that the expositions in the remaining chapters on the memories of a cohort of those who commenced Irish secondary schooling prior to the introduction of free secondary school education in 1967 can be understood in context. Five aspects of the background are outlined. First, the extent of the provision of secondary schooling in Ireland over the period is described. The categories of secondary schools which existed are then detailed. This is followed by an outline of the nature of the State-prescribed secondary school curriculum. An overview on the nature of the secondary school teaching force is then presented. Finally, some perspectives on the ‘general’ approaches used in teaching are considered.

Keywords

Primary School Religious Order Vocational School County Council Religious Life 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Tom O’Donoghue and Judith Harford 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tom O’Donoghue
    • 1
  • Judith Harford
    • 2
  1. 1.The University of Western AustraliaAustralia
  2. 2.University College DublinIreland

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