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Sourcing Is a Continuum

  • Bonnie Keith
  • Kate Vitasek
  • Karl Manrodt
  • Jeanne Kling

Abstract

Sourcing has its roots in our collective past in commerce and trade. As individuals formed family clans, tribes, communities, and complex societies, individual members began to specialize. That led to a division of labor, improved skill and knowledge, and better workmanship. People with specialized skills traded with each other for goods and services they needed to survive. They did not try to be totally self-sufficient; they relied on each other’s talents and productivity and, as a result, lived better.

Keywords

Business Model Preventive Mainte Supply Relationship Prefer Provider Chief Information Officer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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    Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (London: Methuen & Co., first publication 1776; 5th ed. 1904).Google Scholar
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    Kate Vitasek, Karl Manrodt, Richard Wilding, and Tim Cummins, “Unpacking Oliver—10 Lessons to Creating Better Outsourcing Agreements,” APQC, August 6, 2010; http://www.apqc.org/knowledge-base/documents/unpacking-oliver-10-lessons-creating-better-outsourcing-agreements; accessed December 28, 2014.Google Scholar
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    Peter Drucker, “Sell the Mailroom,” Wall Street Journal, July 25, 1989, updated Novemberl5, 2005; http://www.wsj.com/news/articles/SB113202230063197204?mg=reno64-wsj&url=http%3A%2F%2Fonline.wsj.com%2Farticle%2FSB113202230063197204.html; accessed December 29, 2014.Google Scholar
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    Oliver Williamson, “Outsourcing: Transaction Cost Management and Supply Chain Management,” Journal of Supply Chain Management 44, no. 2 (2008): 5–16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Gerard Chick and Robert Handfield, The Procurement Value Proposition (London: Kogan Page, 2012).Google Scholar
  9. 13.
    See Kate Vitasek, Karl Manrodt, and Jeanne Kling, Vested: How P&G, McDonald’s, and Microsoft Are Redefining Winning in Business Relationships (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012).Google Scholar
  10. 17.
    C. K. Prahalad and Gary Hamel, “The Core Competence of the Corporation,” Harvard Business Review 68, no. 3 (1990): 79–91.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Bonnie Keith, Kate Vitasek, Karl Manrodt, and Jeanne Kling 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bonnie Keith
  • Kate Vitasek
  • Karl Manrodt
  • Jeanne Kling

There are no affiliations available

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