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An Introduction to the Eclectic Paradigm as a Meta-Framework for the Cross-Disciplinary Analysis of International Business

  • John Cantwell

Abstract

A major aim of this book on the eclectic paradigm is to enable scholars coming to the International Business (IB) field from a cognate discipline, perhaps for the first time, to be able to connect their own way of thinking about IB issues to a framework for IB analysis that is already well established in our field. It is also hoped that this collection of chapters originally published in the Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS), the leading journal in the IB field, will help to remind mainstream IB scholars of how the framework of the eclectic paradigm has emerged and developed, and of the contribution that JIBS has played in this development.

Keywords

Foreign Direct Investment Host Country Home Country International Business Multinational Enterprise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Academy of International Business 2015

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  • John Cantwell

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