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A Brighter Light into the Darkness: Identifying Human Rights Violations and Sources of Information in the DPRK in the Era of the UN Commission of Inquiry

  • Rajiv Narayan
Part of the Asan-Palgrave Macmillan Series book series (APMS)

Abstract

In March 2013, the UN Human Rights Council (HRC) passed a resolution on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK or North Korea) without a vote that decided “to establish, for a period of one year, a commission of inquiry comprising three members, one of whom should be the Special Rapporteur, with the other two members appointed by the President of the Human Rights Council.”1 The same resolution defined the mandate of the proposed commission of inquiry to “investigate the systematic, widespread and grave violations of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea” which it then defined to include “the violation of the right to food, the violations associated with prison camps, torture and inhuman treatment, arbitrary detention, discrimination, violations of freedom of expression, violations of the right to life, violations of freedom of movement, and enforced disappearances, including in the form of abductions of nationals of other States, with a view to ensuring full accountability, in particular where these violations may amount to crimes against humanity.”2

Keywords

Rome Statute Public Hearing United Nations Security Council Food Crisis Special Rapporteur 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    UN Human Rights Council, The Situation of Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, UN Doc. A/HRC/22/L.19, March 18, 2013.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    United Nations General Assembly, Report of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Marzuki Darusman, UN Doc. A/HRC/22/57, February 1, 2013, 5.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Amnesty International, Ali Lameda: A personal account of the experience of a Prisoner of Conscience in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (January, 1979), ASA 24/002/1979.Google Scholar
  4. 9.
    Amnesty International, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea/Russian Federation: Pursuit, Intimidation and Abuse of North Korean Refugees and Workers (September, 1996), ASA 24/006/1996.Google Scholar
  5. 10.
    Amnesty International, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea: Persecuting the Starving: The Plight of North Koreans fleeing to China (December, 2000), ASA 24/003/2000.Google Scholar
  6. 11.
    Amnesty International, North Korea: Starved of Rights: Human Rights and the Food Crisis in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (January, 2004), ASA 24/003/2004.Google Scholar
  7. 12.
    Amnesty International, North Korea: The Crumbling State of Health Care in North Korea (July, 2010), ASA 24/001/2010.Google Scholar
  8. 13.
    Amnesty International, Human rights for human dignity: A primer on economic, social and cultural rights (August, 2005), POL 34/009/2005, 5.Google Scholar
  9. 16.
    Amnesty International, North Korea: Political Prison Camps (May, 2011), ASA 24/001/2011.Google Scholar
  10. 22.
    See UN Human Rights Council, Report of the detailed findings of the commission of inquiry on human rights in the DPRK, UN Doc. A/HRC/25/CRP.1, February 7, 2014, para. 17.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Baek Buhm-Suk and Ruti G. Teitel 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rajiv Narayan

There are no affiliations available

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