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Transitional Justice in Post-Unification Korea: Challenges and Prospects

  • Baek Buhm-Suk
  • Lisa Collins
  • Kim Yuri
Part of the Asan-Palgrave Macmillan Series book series (APMS)

Abstract

No one knows when unification between the two Koreas will occur. But when it happens, undertaking a fair and transparent process of transitional justice will be a crucial part of determining the success of peace-building and reconciliation efforts in post-unification Korea. This chapter argues that achieving justice and facilitating reconciliation between the peoples of South Korea (ROK) and North Korea (DPRK) during this period is not only important for the long-term peace and stability of the two Koreas, but also of major regional and international significance.

Keywords

Korean Peninsula Security Council Rome Statute Transitional Justice Truth Commission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Baek Buhm-Suk and Ruti G. Teitel 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Baek Buhm-Suk
  • Lisa Collins
  • Kim Yuri

There are no affiliations available

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