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Public Sector Reform

  • Robert P. BeschelJr
  • Tarik M. Yousef
Chapter
Part of the International Economic Association Series book series (IEA)

Abstract

In the brief period since the “Arab Spring” captured the world’s attention in 2011, the political landscape throughout the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) has become the topic of intense hope, concern, and uncertainty. Four years into the transition, it is impossible to predict where the scope and trajectory of change will ultimately head. While the bloodiest of the civil conflicts in Syria has run unabated, other conflicts are back in full force in Libya and Yemen after an intermittent period of relative calm. The renewed threat of extremist militants in Iraq has led the US and its allies to reengage militarily in Iraq and Syria against the so-called Islamic State. And while Egypt is stable by comparison, the regime of President Al-Sissi has begun to resemble if not exceed the authoritarian tendencies of ousted Hosni Mubarak. The only qualified success at present is the nascent democracy of Tunisia, which continues to show promise.

Keywords

Public Sector Middle East Human Resource Management Civil Service Wage Bill 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© International Economic Association 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert P. BeschelJr
  • Tarik M. Yousef

There are no affiliations available

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