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Abstract

The Chinese legal history of the last 60 years has been influenced by a Marxist perspective. According to that, the great Chinese historical periods can be divided into four broad periods of so-called slave law, feudal law, para-capitalist law, and finally socialist law. This simplification has been overcome in recent years, when a less ideology-oriented theory of legal history has been developed. Although for the purposes of this chapter we can limit ourselves to a superficial glance at the history of Chinese law, I prefer to follow a refined general perspective adopted in recent years by Yongping Liu in his Origins of Chinese Law — Penal and Administrative Law in its Early Development.1 Then we will study the importance of Confucius and his central influence towards restorative justice and criminal reconciliation.2 Finally, we will discuss the essential point of reference in studying the historical evolution of Chinese society, consisting of the time references given by the sequence of imperial dynasties.3

Keywords

Restorative Justice Qing Dynasty Criminal Matter Confucian Classic Socialist Legality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Riccardo Berti 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riccardo Berti
    • 1
  1. 1.Zumerle Law FirmItaly

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