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Life and Works: Raymond Aron, Philosopher and Freedom Fighter

  • Nicolas Baverez
Part of the Recovering Political Philosophy book series (REPOPH)

Abstract

Raymond Aron is the greatest figure in French liberalism of the twentieth century. In the tradition of Montesquieu, Constant, Tocqueville, and Elie Halévy, he is part of the French school of political sociology, which he defined in his Les Etapes de la pensée sociologique: “This is mostly a non-dogmatic school of sociologists, primarily interested in politics, who, without ignoring the social infrastructure, respect the autonomy of the political order and think as liberals.” His liberalism, his lucidity in the face of the upheavals of that period, and his posture as a committed observer anxious to ensure consistency among his thoughts, words, and deeds, give him a unique place among French intellectuals, distinguishing him both from his masters—such as Alain, Léon Brunschvicg, and Célestin Bougie— and his contemporaries—-Jean-Paul Sartre, Nizan, and Simone Weil.

Keywords

Twentieth Century Industrial Society Political Liberalism Weimar Republic Nuclear Deterrence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Raymond Aron, Le Grand Schisme, Paris, Gallimard, 1948; Les Guerres en chaîne, Paris, Gallimard, 1951Google Scholar
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    Raymond Aron, Le Spectateur engagé, Paris, Julliard, 1981, 286.Google Scholar
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    Raymond Aron, Les Désillusions du progrès. Essai sur la dialectique de la modernité, Paris, Calmann-Lévy, “Liberté de l’esprit,” 1969, 231.Google Scholar
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    Raymond Aron, “L’Aube de l’histoire universelle,” conference given in London on February 18, 1960, under the sponsorship of the Society of Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, published in Dimensions de la Conscience historique, Paris, Plon, 1961, 295.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© José Colen and Elisabeth Dutartre-Michaut 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicolas Baverez

There are no affiliations available

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