Advertisement

The Brothahood: “Australia’s Mine Too”

  • Joshua M. Roose
Part of the New Directions in Islam book series (NDI)

Abstract

Previous chapters reveal the extensive challenges that have faced Australian-born Muslims, including widespread exclusion from the governmental and Muslim institutional political fields. Some young Muslim men have sought alternative avenues of self-expression and fields through which they could have a larger political impact. This first exemplar focuses on one such group of men and aims to reveal the manner in which social influences interact to shape their political action. The Brothahood are a group of young Australian Muslim men from a wide variety of backgrounds who have formed a common bond through hip-hop, an inherently political style of music that through its very form encourages a vocalization of identity and views. The group has become a pioneer of Muslim hip-hop in Australia and played around the country whilst developing a following in Indonesia, the world’s largest Muslim nation and other Muslim majority nations in Asia. The Brothahood’s music fuses Muslim perspectives and experiences with a Western cultural form to challenge negative representations of Islam in Australia and simultaneously promote self-esteem and pride amongst Muslim listeners. This chapter aims to understand the type of identity displayed by the group and through the application of Bourdieu’s Theory of Practice, how social influences have interacted to shape the group’s political action.

Keywords

Cultural Capital Muslim Woman Muslim Community Symbolic Capital Social Resilience 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 5.
    Dyson, M.E. ‘The Culture of Hip Hop’ in M.T. Forman, & M.A. Neal, (eds.) That’s The Joint: The Hip Hop Studies Reader, New York, Routledge, 2004, p.6.Google Scholar
  2. Watkins, S.C. Hip Hop Matters: Politics, Pop Culture and the Struggle for the Soul of a Movement, Boston, Beacon Press, 2005, p.10.Google Scholar
  3. 6.
    Stapleton, K.R. ‘From the Margins to the Mainstream: The Political Power of Hip-Hop’, Media Culture and Society, Vol.20, No.2, 1998, pp.219–220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 8.
    Jenkins, T. S. ‘Mr Nigger: The Challenges of Educating African American Males in American society’, Journal of Black Studies, Vol.37, No.1, 2006, pp.127–155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 9.
    Jenkins, T.S. ‘A Beautiful Mind: Black male Intellectual Identity and Hip-Hop Culture’, Journal of Black Studies, Vol.42, No.8, 2011, p.1240.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 10.
    Mitchell, T. Global Noise: Rap and Hip Hop Outside the USA, Middletown, CT, Wesleyan University Press, 2001, p.10.Google Scholar
  7. 12.
    Alim, ‘A New Research Agenda: Exploring the Transglobal Hip Hop Umma’ in M. Cooke and B. Lawrence (eds.), Muslim Networks: From Hajj to Hip Hop, North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press, 2005, pp.264–274.Google Scholar
  8. 13.
    Debab, M. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010f.Google Scholar
  9. 14.
    Debab, J. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010.Google Scholar
  10. 15.
    Habibullah, H. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010.Google Scholar
  11. 16.
    Debab, J. Interview, Melbourne, 25 November 2009.Google Scholar
  12. 18.
    Debab, J. Interview, Melbourne, 19 January 2010.Google Scholar
  13. 19.
    Debab, M. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010.Google Scholar
  14. 20.
    In doing so the group displays a variety of embodied capitals, a physical manifestation of their Australian, American, Arab, and Islamic influences though open themselves to accusations from hardline textualists that in using American accents their music is illegitimate. Jehad stated that this had been the cause of some discussion amongst the group and that ultimately it sometimes “just sounded better.” Debab, J. Interview, University of Melbourne, 1 September 2010.Google Scholar
  15. 23.
    Debab, J. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010.Google Scholar
  16. 34.
    Castells, M. The Power of Identity, West Sussex, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010, p.8.Google Scholar
  17. 35.
    Habibullah, H. Interview, Brunswick, 10 February 2010.Google Scholar
  18. 36.
    Toohey, M. Interview, Broadmeadows, 21 January 2011.Google Scholar
  19. 37.
    Saeed, A. Islamic Thought: An Introduction, London, Routledge, 2006, pp.50–51.Google Scholar
  20. 40.
    Saeed, A. The Qu’ran: An Introduction, London, Routledge, 2008, p.206.Google Scholar
  21. 44.
    Habibullah, H. Interview, Melbourne, 30 March 2010.Google Scholar
  22. 45.
    Debab, J. Interview, Melbourne, 26 February 2010.Google Scholar
  23. 49.
    Bakan, T. Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 9 March 2010.Google Scholar
  24. 51.
    Debab, M. Interview, Epping Plaza, 6 February 2010.Google Scholar
  25. 54.
    Debab, J. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010.Google Scholar
  26. 55.
    Ahmed, A. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010.Google Scholar
  27. 56.
    Debab, M. Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 15 December 2010.Google Scholar
  28. 57.
    Debab, J. Interview, Melbourne, 19 January 2010, op. cit.Google Scholar
  29. 59.
    Ahmed, A. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010.Google Scholar
  30. 62.
    Debab, M. Interview, Epping Plaza, 6 February 2010.Google Scholar
  31. 65.
    Dwyer, C. ‘From cricket lover to terror suspect’ — Challenging Representations of Young British Muslim Men’, Gender, Place and Culture, Vol.15, No.2, 2008, pp.117–136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 66.
    Colic-Pesker, V. ‘The Rise of Multicultural Middle Class: A New Stage of Australian Multiculturalism?’, Paper Presented to The Australian Sociological Association, Australian National University, Canberra, 1–4 December 2009. p.6.Google Scholar
  33. 67.
    McCue, H. The Civil and Social Participation of Women in Australian Community Life, Edsoc Consulting, 2008, pp.23–24.Google Scholar
  34. 68.
    Yasmeen, S. ‘Muslim Women as Citizens in Australia: Diverse Notions and Practices’, Australian Journal of Social Issues, Vol.42, No.1, 2007. p.49.Google Scholar
  35. 71.
    Habibullah, H. and Debab, M. Group Interview, Sahara’s Pizza, Brunswick, 13 March 2010Google Scholar
  36. 72.
    Bakan, T. Interview, Kebab Station, Coburg, 25 November 2009.Google Scholar
  37. 73.
    Habibullah, H. Interview, Dandenong Plaza, 20 January 2010.Google Scholar
  38. 86.
    Humphrey, M. ‘Injuries and Identities: Authorising Arab Diasporic Difference in Crisis’ in G. Hage. (ed.) Arab Australians Today: Citizenship and Belonging, Carlton, Melbourne University Press, 2002, p.206Google Scholar
  39. 92.
    Esposito, J. and Kalin, I. (eds.) The 500 Most Influential Muslims 2009, The Royal Islamic Strategic Studies Centre, Georgetown University. Retrieved 16 July 2010 from: http://www.rissc.jo/docs/1N-WithCovers(lowres).pdf.Google Scholar
  40. 105.
    Wacquant, L.J.D. ‘The Pugilistic Point of view: How Boxers Think and Feel about Their Trade’, Theory and Society, Vol.24, No.4, 1995, p.501.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. 124.
    Frisina, A. ‘Young Muslims’ Everyday Tactics and Strategies: Resisting Islamophobia, Negotiating Italianness, Becoming Citizens’, Journal of Intercultural Studies, Vol.31, No.5, 2010, pp.560–569.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Joshua M. Roose 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua M. Roose

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations