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The Black Sheep: Djuna Barnes’s Dark Pastoral

  • Andrew Kalaidjian
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Animals and Literature book series (PSAAL)

Abstract

Starting in 1960, Djuna Barnes spent over 20 years writing, revising, and re-spinning the long poem called variously “Rite of Spring,” “Vagrant Spring,” “Viaticum,” and “Transfiguration,” among other working titles (figure 3.1).1

Keywords

Short Story Special Collection Manuscript Draft Night Watch Functional Cycle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Andrew Kalaidjian 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew Kalaidjian

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