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The Creativity Age

  • Teressa Iezzi

Abstract

In 2006, Esquire magazine named ad man David Droga to its annual “Best and Brightest” list. As its name implies,1 the list comprised walking superlatives only. The other 41 bright lights included Sebastian Thrun, an artificial intelligence expert pioneering self-driving cars; evolutionary biologist Paul Hebert; Hugh Herr, a prosthetics developer at MIT; and Princeton professor and creator of quantumcascade lasers, Claire Gmachl.

Keywords

Personal Brand Super Bowl Media Landscape Creative Company Product Design Effort 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 3.
    A ridiculous, almost infinite number of books on “the industry” are published each year. Ignore nearly all of them. You’ve got too much else to read. Some of the titles you might actually want to pay attention to are listed here. Some of them are not necessarily about the industry. They are about social, cultural and technological changes that require attention. For a fantastic, all-round account of why creativity matters more than ever today: A Whole New Mind: Why Right-Brainers Will Rule the Future, by Daniel Pink (New York: Riverhead Books, 2005).Google Scholar
  2. For an exceedingly intelligent examination of the origin and meaning of social media and the impact of digital technology on the way people behave in general: Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing without Organizations, by Clay Shirky (New York: Penguin, 2008)Google Scholar
  3. And for what that change in behavior means to society Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age, by Clay Shirky (New York: Penguin, 2010).Google Scholar
  4. For the most raunchy and brilliant novel that has anything whatever to do with the ad industry: Money, by Martin Amis (New York: Penguin, 1986)Google Scholar
  5. If you just need something great to read and haven’t read it yet: Blood Meridian: Or the Evening Redness in the West, by Cormac Mc-Carthy (New York: Vintage, 1992).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Crain Communications, Inc. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Teressa Iezzi

There are no affiliations available

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