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The Government of Nature: Post-Neoliberal Environmental Governance in Bolivia and Ecuador

  • Pablo A. Andrade

Abstract

In 2005 and 2006, anti-neoliberal coalitions won the elections in Bolivia and Ecuador, respectively. In both countries, this development put an end to the rules that had regulated the use of natural resources in hydrocarbon extraction during the latter part of the twentieth century (Hogenboom, 2014). The post-neoliberal governments constructed new institutions for the governance of extractive-industry activities. The new rules of the game have changed the way in which the Andean countries govern extractive industries. It has not put an end to their dependence on income generated from natural resources, but it has changed the way in which that income is distributed.

Keywords

Environmental Governance Extractive Industry Resource Curse Bolivian State Popular Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Pablo Andrade A. 2016

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  • Pablo A. Andrade

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