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Regional Differences

  • Mike Rosenberg
Part of the The Palgrave Macmillan IESE Business Collection book series (IESEBC)

Abstract

According to Pedro Videla, the chair of the Economics Department at IESE Business School, the headline in the history books for the last 10–20 years will not be about the internet or the 2008 financial crisis but the incredible increase in prosperity in the developing world, which saw an unprecedented 450 million people come out of poverty in the period from 1980 to 2010.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product Regional Difference Carbon Emission Environmental Kuznets Curve Environmental Sensibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Mike Rosenberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Rosenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.IESE Business SchoolSpain

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