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Industry Examples

  • Mike Rosenberg
Part of the The Palgrave Macmillan IESE Business Collection book series (IESEBC)

Abstract

There are important differences in the way the five strategic issues that were covered in Chapter 3 play out in different industries. This chapter will thus explore those differences, by looking at five examples, and discuss how each industry’s relationship with the environment has developed and look at where it is today. The apparent strategy of specific companies will also be looked at using the strategies introduced in Chapter 4.

Keywords

Supply Chain Carbon Footprint Fuel Economy Seat Belt Global Reporting Initiative 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Mike Rosenberg 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mike Rosenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.IESE Business SchoolSpain

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