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Preparing for the 1912 Olympics

  • Luke J. Harris

Abstract

British interest in the Olympic movement quickly died away when summer turned to autumn in 1908. The lack of interest was reflected in the coverage of the events of the ‘autumn’ Games (football, rugby, hockey and cycle polo). It was not until the spring of 1909, and the beginnings of a new season of athletics, that the Games were mentioned once again, although often this was brief and reflective upon the events of 1908.

Keywords

Field Event Olympic Game Event Athlete Field Athletic Inaugural Meeting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Luke J. Harris 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luke J. Harris
    • 1
  1. 1.Canterbury Christ Church UniversityUK

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