Advertisement

Places of Death — Constructing Asylum-Seekers’ and Refugees’ Countries of Origin

  • Steve Kirkwood
  • Simon Goodman
  • Chris McVittie
  • Andy McKinlay

Abstract

Becoming a refugee means leaving one’s home and being an international refugee means leaving one’s country of origin behind, which is true of asylum-seekers in the UK. The literature on asylum-seeking and refugees suggests that there are a number of reasons that cause refugees to leave their countries of origin. According to Neumayer (2005), oppression, violence and human rights abuses are among the main reasons for refugees fleeing their homes. The countries from which most refugees in the UK come do indeed have poor records on human rights and tend to have ongoing conflict, including Pakistan, Iran, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan (United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 2011). While it will be shown (in chapters 4 and 5) that asylum-seekers’ reasons for coming to the UK can be challenged, the accounts of asylum-seekers themselves suggest that they are fleeing extremely harsh and difficult situations. For example, Crawley argues that ‘conflict is the single most significant factor associated with most flows of asylum-seekers to the countries of Europe’ (2010, p. 20), a claim that is backed up with an example from an Iraqi refugee experiencing conflict:

I am not Muslim, I am a Sabian Mandaean. You either have to leave Iraq or change your religion. I went with my parents to stay with a Christian friend but this was not safe.

Keywords

Sexual Violence Bright Side United Nations High Commissioner Iraqi Refugee Dangerous Place 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Further reading

  1. Neumayer, E. (2005). Bogus refugees? The determinants of asylum migration to Western Europe. International Studies Quarterly, 49, 389–409.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Sirriyeh, A. (2013). Inhabiting Borders, Routes Home: Youth, Gender, Asylum. Farnham: Ashgate.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Steve Kirkwood, Simon Goodman, Chris McVittie and Andy McKinlay 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steve Kirkwood
    • 1
  • Simon Goodman
    • 2
  • Chris McVittie
    • 3
  • Andy McKinlay
    • 1
  1. 1.University of EdinburghUK
  2. 2.Coventry UniversityUK
  3. 3.Queen Margaret UniversityUK

Personalised recommendations