Advertisement

Abstract

Since the 1980s, quality assurance in higher education has grown dramatically, has come to affect every level of the sector and has become an accepted and integral part of academic life. Saarinen (2010, p. 55) has observed that ‘quality has turned from a debatable and controversial concept to an everyday issue in higher education’. Concomitantly, quality assurance has become, as Rosa and Amaral (2014, p. 9) describe it, a ‘professionalized’ and internationally networked activity. However, as higher education faces increasingly difficult challenges of globalization and marketization, so too quality assurance becomes increasingly complex. At the same time, the literature on quality assurance has also increased in scale and complexity. How are we to make sense of it all? This chapter reviews the key research relating to quality assurance in higher education. The focus of the chapter will be research conducted since the early 1990s, when quality became a key concern of the sector, what Newton has referred to (2002) as the ‘quality revolution’. However, earlier work, will be cited where relevant.

Keywords

High Education Quality Assurance Quality Process External Quality Academic Staff 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alperin, J. P. (2013) ‘Brazil’s exception to the world-class movement’, Quality in Higher Education, 19(2), 158–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Amaral, A. (2007) ‘The many rationales for quality’, in L. Bollaert, S. Brus, B. Curvale, L. Harvey, E. Helle, H. Toft Jensen, J. Komljenovic?, A. Orphanides and A. Sursock (eds) Embedding Quality Culture in Higher Education (pp. 6–10) (Brussels: European Universities Association).Google Scholar
  3. Amaral, A. and M. J. Rosa (2010) ‘Recent trends in quality assurance’, Quality in Higher Education, 16(1), 59–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Anderson, G. (2006) ‘Assuring quality/resisting quality assurance: Academics’ responses to “quality” in some Australian universities’, Quality in Higher Education, 12(2), 161–173.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Baldwin, G. (1997) ‘Quality assurance in Australian higher education: The case of Monash University’, Quality in Higher Education, 3(1), 51–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Barrow, M. (1999) ‘Quality-management systems and dramaturgical compliance’, Quality in Higher Education, 5(1), 27–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Biggs, J. B. (1999), Teaching for Quality Learning at University (Buckingham: SRHE and Open University Press).Google Scholar
  8. Blackmur, D. (2010) ‘Does the emperor have the right (or any) clothes? The public regulation of higher education qualities over the last two decades’, Quality in Higher Education, 16(1), 67–69CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Blanco Ramírez, G. (2014) ‘Trading quality across borders: Colonial discourse and international quality assurance policies in higher education’, Tertiary Education and Management, 20(2), 121–134CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Bramming, P. (2007) ‘An argument for strong learning in higher education’, Quality in Higher Education, 13(1), 45–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Brown, R. (2004) Quality Assurance in Higher Education: The UK Experience since1992 (Abingdon: RoutledgeFalmer).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Brown, R. (2014) What Price Quality Enhancement? (York: Higher Education Academy).Google Scholar
  13. Campbell, C. and C. Rozsnyai (2002) Quality Assurance and the Development of Course Programmes (Bucharest: UNESCO).Google Scholar
  14. Cheng, M. (2009) ‘Academics’ professionalism and quality mechanisms: Challenges and tensions’, Quality in Higher Education, 15(3), 193–205.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Cheng, M. (2014) ‘Quality as transformation: Educational metamorphosis’, Quality in Higher Education, 20(3), 272–289.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Crozier, F., Costes, N., Ranne, P. and M. Stalter (2013) ENQA: 10 Years (2000–2010): A Decade of European Co-Operation in Quality Assurance in Higher Education (Brussels: European Association of Quality Assurance Agencies).Google Scholar
  17. Danø, T. and B. Stensaker (2007) ‘Still balancing improvement and accountability? Developments in external quality assurance in the Nordic countries 1996–2006’, Quality in Higher Education, 13(1), 81–93.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Dill, D. D. (1995) ‘Through Deming’s eyes: A cross-national analysis of quality assurance policies in higher education’, Quality in Higher Education, 1(2), 95–110.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Dill, D. D. (2000) ‘Designing academic audit: Lessons learned in Europe and Asia’, Quality in Higher Education, 6(3), 187–207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Dolnicar, S. (2005) ‘Should we still lecture or just post examination questions on the web?: The nature of the shift towards pragmatism in undergraduate lecture attendance’, Quality in Higher Education, 11(2), 103–115.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. European University Association (EUA) (2006) Quality Culture in European Universities: A Bottom-up Approach (Brussels: European Universities Association).Google Scholar
  22. Ewell, P. T. (1999) ‘Linking performance measures to resource allocation: Exploring unmapped terrain’, Quality in Higher Education, 5(3), 191–209.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Faber, M. and J. Huisman (2003) ‘Same voyage, different routes? The course of the Netherlands and Denmark to a “European model” of quality assurance’, Quality in Higher Education, 9(3), 231–242.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Fearnley, S. (1995) ‘Class size: The erosive effect of recruitment numbers on performance’, Quality in Higher Education, 1(1), 59–65.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Filippakou, O. and T. Tapper (2008) ‘Quality assurance and quality enhancement in higher education: contested territories?’ Higher Education Quarterly 62(1–2), 84–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Gibbs, G. (2010) Dimensions of Quality (York: Higher Education Academy).Google Scholar
  27. Gibbs, P. (2009) ‘Quality in work-based studies not lost, merely undiscovered’, Quality in Higher Education, 15(2), 167–176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Gordon, G. (2002) ‘The roles of leadership and ownership in building an effective quality culture’, Quality in Higher Education, 8(1), 97–106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Gordon, G. and C. Owen (2009) SHEEC Theme on the Management of Quality: Cultures of enhancement and quality management systems and structures. Final Report November 2008, Published January 23, 2009, SHEEC. Retrieved February 25, 2015, from http://www.enhancementthemes.ac.uk/docs/report/the-management-of-quality-cultures-of-quality-enhancement.pdf?sfvrsn=18.
  30. Gosling, D. and V.-M. D’Andrea (2001) ‘Quality development: A new concept for higher education’, Quality in Higher Education, 7(1), 7–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Haakstad, J. (2001) ‘Accreditation: The new quality assurance formula? Some reflections as Norway is about to reform its quality assurance system’, Quality in Higher Education, 7(1), 77–82.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Harker, B. (1995) ‘Postmodernism and quality’, Quality in Higher Education, 1(1), 31–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Harvey, L. (1999) Evaluating the evaluators, paper presented at the Fifth Biennial Conference of the International Network of Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education (INQAAHE). Santiago, Chile.Google Scholar
  34. Harvey, L. (2001) ‘Defining and measuring employability’, Quality in Higher Education, 7(2), 97–109.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Harvey, L. (2003) ‘Student feedback’, Quality in Higher Education, 9(1), 3–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Harvey, L. (2005) ‘A history and critique of quality evaluation in the UK’, Quality Assurance in Education, 13(4), 263–276.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Harvey, L. (2006a) ‘Understanding quality’, Section B 4.1–1 of ‘Introducing Bologna objectives and tools’, in L. Purser (ed) EUA Bologna Handbook: Making Bologna work (Brussels: European University Association and Berlin, Raabe).Google Scholar
  38. Harvey, L. (2006b) ‘Impact of quality assurance: Overview of a discussion between representatives of external quality assurance agencies’, Quality in Higher Education, 12(3), 287–290.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Harvey, L. (2007a) ‘The epistemology of quality’, Perspectives in Education, 25(3), 1–13.Google Scholar
  40. Harvey, L. (2007b) ‘Quality culture, quality assurance and impact: Overview of discussions’, in L. Bollaert, S. Brus, B. Curvale, L. Harvey, E. Helle, H. Toft Jensen, J. Komljenovic, A. Orphanides and A. Sursock (eds) Embedding Quality Culture in European Higher Education (pp. 81–84a) (Brussels: European University Association).Google Scholar
  41. Harvey, L., Burrows, A. and D. Green (1992) Total Student Experience: A First Report of the QHE National Survey of Staff and Students’ Views of the Important Criteria for Assessing the Quality of Higher Education (Birmingham: University of Central England).Google Scholar
  42. Harvey, L. and D. Green (1993) ‘Defining quality’, Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 18(1), pp. 9–34.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Harvey, L. and P. Knight (1996) Transforming Higher Education (Buckingham: Open University Press and Society for Research into Higher Education).Google Scholar
  44. Harvey, L. and J. Newton (2004) ‘Transforming quality evaluation’, Quality in Higher Education, 10(2), 149–165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Harvey, L. and B. Stensaker (2008) ‘Quality culture: Understandings, boundaries and linkages’, European Journal of Education, 43(4), 427–42.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  46. Harvey, L. and J. Williams (2010a) ‘Fifteen years of quality in higher education (Part One)’, Quality in Higher Education 16(2), 3–36.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Harvey, L. and J. Williams (2010b) ‘Fifteen years of quality in higher education (Part Two)’, Quality in Higher Education 16(2), 79–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Hill, R. (1995) ‘A European student perspective on quality’, Quality in Higher Education, 1(1), 67–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Horsburgh, M. (1999) ‘Quality monitoring in higher Education: The impact on student learning’, Quality in Higher Education, 5(1), 9–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Iacovidou, M., Gibbs, P. and A. Zopiatis (2009) ‘An exploratory use of the stakeholder approach to defining and measuring quality: The case of a Cypriot higher education institution’, Quality in Higher Education, 15(2), 147–165.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Idrus, N. (2003) ‘Transforming quality for development’, Quality in Higher Education, 9(2), 141–150.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. Jacobs, G. J. and A. Du Toit (2006) ‘Contrasting faculty quality views and practices over a five-year interval’, Quality in Higher Education, 12(3), 303–314.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Kumi, S. and J. Morrow (2006) ‘Improving self-service the six sigma way at Newcastle University Library’, Program 40(2), 123–136CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Leeuw, F. L. (2002) ‘Reciprocity and educational evaluations by European Inspectorates: Assumptions and reality checks’, Quality in Higher Education, 8(2), 137–149.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Lemaitre, M. J. (2002) ‘Quality as politics’, Quality in Higher Education, 8(1), 29–37.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Little, B. (2001) ‘Reading between the lines of graduate employment’, Quality in Higher Education, 7(2), 121–129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  57. Little, S. (ed) (2011) Staff-Student Partnerships in Higher Education (London: Continuum).Google Scholar
  58. Loukkola, T., Zhang, T., Sursock, A. and A. Vettori (2012) Examining Quality Culture in Higher Education Institutions (Brussels: European Universities Association). Retrieved December 3, 2014, from http://www.eua.be/eqc.Google Scholar
  59. Massy, W. (2003) Honoring the Trust: Quality and Cost Containment in Higher Education (Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing).Google Scholar
  60. Massy, W., Graham, S. and P. M. Short (2007) Academic Quality Work: A Handbook for Improvement (Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing).Google Scholar
  61. Mauléon, C. and B. Bergman (2009) ‘Exploring the epistemological origins of Shewhart’s and Deming’s theory of quality: Influences from C.I. Lewis’ conceptualistic pragmatism’, International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences 1(2), 160–171.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  62. McInnis, C. (2000) ‘Changing academic work roles: The everyday realities challenging quality in teaching’, Quality in Higher Education, 6(2), 143–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  63. Meade, P. (1995) ‘Utilising the university as a learning organisation to facilitate quality improvement’, Quality in Higher Education, 1(2), 111–121.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  64. Melrose, M. (1998) ‘Exploring paradigms of curriculum evaluation and concepts of quality’, Quality in Higher Education, 4(1), 37–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  65. Middlehurst, R. (1997) ‘Reinventing higher education: The leadership challenge’, Quality in Higher Education, 3(2), 183–198.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  66. Naidoo, D. (2013) ‘Reconciling organisational culture and external quality assurance in higher education’, Higher Education Management and Policy, 24(2), 85–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  67. Narasimhan, K. (2001) ‘Improving the climate of teaching sessions: The use of evaluations by students and instructors’, Quality in Higher Education, 7(3), 179–190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  68. Newton, J. (2000) ‘Feeding the beast or improving quality? Academics’ perceptions of quality assurance and quality monitoring’, Quality in Higher Education, 6(2), 153–163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  69. Newton, J. (2002) ‘Views from below: Academics coping with quality’, Quality in Higher Education, 8(1), 39–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  70. Nygaard, C., Brand, S., Bartholomew, P. and L. Millard (eds) (2013) Student Engagement: Identity, Motivation and Community (Farringdon: Libri Publishing).Google Scholar
  71. Pirsig, R. K. (1974) Zen and Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (London: Bodley Head).Google Scholar
  72. Popli, S. (2005) ‘Ensuring customer delight: A quality approach to excellence in management education’, Quality in Higher Education, 11(1), 17–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  73. Raban, C. (2007) ‘Assurance versus enhancement: Less is more?’ Journal of Further and Higher Education, 31(1), 77–85.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. Ratcliff, J. L. (2003) ‘Dynamic and communicative aspects of quality assurance’, Quality in Higher Education, 9(2), 117–131.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  75. Richardson, J. T. E. (2005) ‘Instruments for obtaining student feedback: A review of the literature’, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 30(4), 387–415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  76. Rosa, M. J. and A. Amaral (2014) Quality Assurance in Higher Education Contemporary Debates (Houndsmills: Palgrave Macmillan).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  77. Rowley, J. (1996) ‘Measuring quality in higher education’, Quality in Higher Education, 2(3), 237–255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  78. Saarinen, T. (2005) ‘From sickness to cure and further: Construction of “quality” in Finnish higher education policy from the 1960s to the era of the Bologna process’, Quality in Higher Education, 11(1), 3–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  79. Saarinen, T. (2010) ‘What I talk about when I talk about quality’, Quality in Higher Education, 16(1), 55–7.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. Silver, H. (1996) ‘External examining in higher education: A secret history’, in R. Aldrich (ed) History and Education: A Tribute to Peter Gordon (London: The Woburn Press).Google Scholar
  81. Singh, M. (2010) ‘Quality assurance in higher education: Which pasts to build on, what futures to contemplate?’ Quality in Higher Education, 16(2), 189–194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  82. Stensaker, B. (2003) ‘Trance, transparency and transformation: The impact of external quality monitoring on higher education’, Quality in Higher Education, 9(2), 151–159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. Swinglehurst, D., Russell, J. and T. Greenhalgh (2008) ‘Peer observation of teaching in an online environment: An action research perspective’, Journal of Computer Assisted Learning 24(5), 383–393.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. Tam, M. (1999) ‘Managing change involves changing management: Implications for transforming higher education’, Quality in Higher Education, 5(3), 227–232.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. Tam, M. (2001) ‘Measuring quality and performance in higher education’, Quality in Higher Education, 7(1), 47–54.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. van Damme, D. (2000) ‘Accreditation in global higher education: The need for international information and cooperation. Outline of an IAUP approach’, Memo for the Commission on Global Accreditation of the International Association of University Presidents New York.Google Scholar
  87. Van Kemenade, E., Pupius, M. and T. W. Hardjono (2008) ‘More value to defining quality’, Quality in Higher Education, 14(2), 175–185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. Vlãsceanu, L., Grünberg, L. and D. Pârlea (2004) Quality Assurance and Accreditation: A Glossary of Basic Terms and Definitions (Bucharest: UNESCO-CEPES). Retrieved February 25, 2015, from http://www.aic.lv/bolona/Bologna/contrib/UNESCO/QA&A%20Glossary.pdf.Google Scholar
  89. Vroeijenstijn, A. I. (1991) External Quality Assessment: Servant of Two Masters?, paper presented at the Council for Academic Accreditation Conference on ‘Quality Assurance in Higher Education’, Hong Kong, July 15–17, 1991.Google Scholar
  90. Westerheijden, D. F. (2001) ‘Ex oriente lux?: National and multiple accreditation in Europe after the fall of the Wall and after Bologna’, Quality in Higher Education, 7(1), 65–75.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. Williams, J. and G. Cappuccini-Ansfield (2007) ‘Fitness for purpose? National and institutional approaches to publicising the student voice’, Quality in Higher Education, 13(2), 159–172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. Woodhouse, D. (2003) ‘Quality improvement through quality audit’, Quality in Higher Education, 9(2), 133–139.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  93. Woodhouse, D. (2004) ‘The quality of quality assurance agencies’, Quality in Higher Education, 10(2), 77–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. Yorke, M. (1998) ‘Performance indicators relating to student development: Can they be trusted?’, Quality in Higher Education, 4(1), 45–61.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© James Williams and Lee Harvey 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Williams
  • Lee Harvey

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations