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The Hindu-Jewish Encounter: The Present Context

  • Alon Goshen-Gottstein
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Part of the Interreligious Studies in Theory and Practice book series (INSTTP)

Abstract

Jews and Hindus had no significant contact for millennia. With the exception of a tiny Jewish community in India and the occasional contact made possible through travel and commerce, India was a distant memory. It left an impression on Jewish literature, but never made it to the status of a significant other.1I am not aware of Judaism making any impression on Hindu religious, legal, or philosophical literature, until the twentieth century.2 It is only during the twentieth century that the relationship between Judaism and Hinduism started to come into its own and indeed, this relationship may still be a thing of the future.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    (see Nathan Katz, The State of the Art of Hindu-Jewish Dialogue, Indo-Judaic Studies in the Twenty-First Century: A View from the Margin, ed. Nathan Katz et al., Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2007, p. 124).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 3.
    See Nathan Katz, The State of the Art of Hindu-Jewish Dialogue, Indo-Judaic Studies in the Twenty-First Century, ed. Nathan Katz et al., Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2007, pp. 113–126,CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. The Hindu-Jewish Encounter and the Future, The Fifty Eighth Century: A Jewish Renewal Sourcebook, ed. Shohama Wiener, Jason Aaronson, Northvale, NJ, 1996, pp. 331–343.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    see Miriam Dean-Otting, Hugo Bergman, Leo Baeck, and Martin Buber, Jewish Perspectives on Hinduism and Buddhism, Journal of Indo Judaic Studies, 1, 2, 1999, pp. 7–26.Google Scholar
  5. 7.
    See Arye Kaplan, Jewish Meditation: A Practical Guide, Schoken, New York, 1985, p. vi.Google Scholar
  6. See Tomer Persico, “Jewish Meditation”: The Development of a Modern Form of Spiritual Practice in Contemporary Judaism, PhD thesis, Tel Aviv University, 2012, pp. 385–389.Google Scholar
  7. 8.
    Daria Maoz, Every Age and Its Backpack, From India Till Here, ed. Elhanan Nir, Rubin Mass, Jerusalem, 2006, pp. 107–125 [Hebrew].Google Scholar
  8. 11.
    See Jacob Katz, Exclusiveness and Tolerance, Oxford University Press, London, 1961.Google Scholar
  9. see Richard Marks, Hindus and Hinduism in Medieval Jewish Literature, Indo-Judaic Studies in the Twenty-First Century: A View from the Margin, ed. Nathan Katzet al., Palgrave Macmillan, New York, 2007, pp. 65–67Google Scholar
  10. 13.
    see Laurie Patton and Shalom Goldman, Indian Love Call: Israelis, Orthodoxy and Indian Culture, Judaism 50,3, 2001, pp. 351–361.Google Scholar
  11. See also Daria Maoz, When Images Become “True”: The Israeli Backpacking Experience in India, Karmic Passages, Israeli Scholarship on India, ed. David Shulman and Shalva Weil, Oxford University Press, New Delhi, 2008, pp. 214–231.Google Scholar
  12. 15.
    Hananya Goodman’s, Between Jerusalem and Benares, SUNY Press, Albany, NY, 1994.Google Scholar
  13. 18.
    Jewish Ones. (Biderman’s Philosophical Journeys: India and the West, Yediot Aharonot Press, Tel Aviv, 2003 [Hebrew]Google Scholar

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© Alon Goshen-Gottstein 2016

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  • Alon Goshen-Gottstein

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