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Protecting Journalists: An Evolving Responsibility

  • Richard Sambrook

Abstract

The Newseum in Washington DC, run by the Freedom Forum, lists 69 reporters killed during the Second World War and 66 in the ten peak years of the Vietnam War. In Iraq in 2003, the (Committee to Protect Journalists) says more than 70 were killed. Both organisations recognise those numbers may be under-reported. However, the correlation between casualties in a global conflict over six years, and a regional conflict lasting just weeks indicates the increase in risk for journalists over the intervening 60 years. If you include the subsequent insurgency in Iraq during the following eight years, the figure rises to more than 200 — the vast majority Iraqi — according to the CPJ (Smyth 2013).

Keywords

Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Armed Conflict News Agency United Nations Security Council 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Richard Sambrook

There are no affiliations available

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