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Introduction

  • Simon Cottle
  • Richard Sambrook
  • Nick Mosdell

Abstract

Journalism is becoming a more dangerous profession. Reporters and editors are being targeted, murdered, and intimidated more regularly and in increasing numbers. Yet it is not an issue which in itself is often reported. Occasionally, there is an event, such as the murder of the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists in Paris, which brings to the fore the violent opposition journalism and free speech can face even in the West. And once a year the free speech and journalism non-governmental organisations such as the Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), the International News Safety Institute (INSI), or Reporters Sans Frontières (RSF) report their annual tally of journalists and media workers killed. But the underlying facts and trends behind these figures are little discussed, and the wider impact on society little considered.

Keywords

Civil Society Free Speech Armed Group Global Civil Society Muslim Brotherhood 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Cottle
    • 1
  • Richard Sambrook
    • 1
  • Nick Mosdell
    • 1
  1. 1.School of JournalismCardiff UniversityCardiffUK

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