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Beyond Reality Dissonance: Improving Sustainability of Peace Education Effects

  • Yigal Rosen
Part of the Palgrave Macmillan’s Postcolonial Studies in Education book series (PCSE)

Abstract

Peace education in a region of intractable conflict faces a negative sociopolitical environment that works against its effects. The media, leadership, educational system, and other societal institutions continue to express a culture of conflict. In the light of these barriers, it would make sense to assume that peace education programs do not stand much of a chance of being truly effective. Indeed, recent studies show that the effects of peace education programs are short-lived and methods to sustain the effects over time are needed. The present chapter describes the societal-psychological climate of intractable conflict, the goals of peace education in such regions, the challenges of achieving these goals, and possible ways to overcome these challenges. Peace education programs should be designed to effectively manage the “reality dissonance” between the sought-for effects and sociopolitical environment. Mechanisms for sustaining educational change are described along with a model for program design. Finally the chapter offers several conclusions and directions for future research.

Keywords

Educational Change American Educational Research Association Peace Process Sustained Impact Peace Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Carmel Borg and Michael Grech 2014

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  • Yigal Rosen

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