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Regional Monetary Cooperation in Emerging, Transition, and Developing Economies

  • Barbara Fritz
  • Laurissa Mühlich

Abstract

This chapter systematically examines the variety of regional cooperation arrangements in the developing world that range from regional payment systems over the pooling of reserves to exchange rate coordination. The main contribution of regional monetary cooperation to enhancing the shock buffering ability of its member countries is to provide short-term liquidity and to increase regional trade and financial links. The potential for shock buffering is dependent on the chosen form of regional monetary cooperation. In contrast to full monetary integration which is highly demanding in terms of policy coordination, the requirements for regional policy coordination are significantly lower, depending on the form and aim of regional monetary cooperation arrangements.

Keywords

Exchange Rate Monetary Policy Real Exchange Rate Gulf Cooperation Council Exchange Rate Policy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Barbara Fritz And Laurissa Mühlich 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Fritz
  • Laurissa Mühlich

There are no affiliations available

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