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Fueling Europe

  • Per Högselius
  • Arne Kaijser
  • Erik van der Vleuten
Part of the Making Europe: Technology and Transformations, 1850–2000 book series (MAKE)

Abstract

On January 1, 2006, Russian energy company Gazprom interrupted its delivery of natural gas to neighboring Ukraine. During a few dramatic days the decision gave rise to worries in large parts of Europe, particularly in the countries situated further downstream along the same pipeline. On January 2, gas companies in Hungary, Slovakia, and Austria reported a drastic drop in pressure—at a time of peak winter heat demand. Operators farther west did their best to counteract the emergency situation by rescheduling and redirecting gas flows, seeking to compensate for the absent Russian supply with gas from Norwegian, Dutch, and Algerian sources. Still, a crisis threatened a vast number of households, municipal institutions, industrial enterprises, and power plants. At stake was millions of Europeans’ access to electricity, space heating, hot water, and gas for cooking, along with a variety of industrial gas needs.

Keywords

Nuclear Power Plant Power Company Iron Curtain Energy Infrastructure Power Pool 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Per Högselius, Arne Kaijser, Erik van der Vleuten and Foundation for the History of Technology 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Per Högselius
  • Arne Kaijser
  • Erik van der Vleuten

There are no affiliations available

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