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‘Women Are the Best Friends of Mr Chamberlain’s Policy:’ Gendered Representations of Public Opinion

  • Julie V. Gottlieb

Abstract

Michael Barsely’s little ditty, “Mess Observation,” brilliantly captures the sense of disarray within a middle- class British family in the fallout of the Munich Crisis:

Ever since the Crisis came, Nothing’s really been the same. Blight has settled on ‘The Limes,’ Father cannot trust The Times Mother, fresh from the Express, Still believes we’re in a mess. Tom’s been drinking with his lunches, Dick’s developed awful hunches, Harry, if the truth be told, Looks preposterously old. Aunt Matilda says we must Stick to Chamberlain or bust, Captain Trumpet blames the Yids, Mildred says she won’t have kids, George just goes on saying ‘Spain,’ Like an animal in pain. No one bothers to repair Household fittings anywhere, Precious ramblers go unpruned, Grand pianos go untuned. And it’s eerie, after dark, By the trenches in the park. Advertisers all implore Everyone to purchase more, But the shade of Ribbentrop Wanders into every shop. In this year of ‘peace and plenty’ No one’s happy over twenty, Joan’s been fitted for a tunic, On my heart is written ‘Munich’— Nothing’s really been the same, Ever since the Crisis came.1

Keywords

Public Opinion Prime Minister Foreign Policy Foreign Affair Gender Representation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Julie V. Gottlieb 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julie V. Gottlieb
    • 1
  1. 1.University of SheffieldUK

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