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Policing Political Protest: Lessons of Best Practice from a Major English City

  • David Waddington

Abstract

This chapter focuses on a 30-year period of political protest occurring in Western democracies from 1983 to 2013. It draws upon a related body of research, based on demonstrations in the major UK city of Sheffield, South Yorkshire, to highlight those policing strategies and tactics which help to ensure that events of this nature remain predominantly trouble-free and devoid of major confrontation.

Keywords

Public Order Liberal Democrat Party Western Democracy Police Strategy Police Legitimacy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© David Waddington 2014

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  • David Waddington

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