Philip Gould pp 92-107 | Cite as

The Land and the Sea

  • James Purnell

Abstract

I remember sitting with Philip on a sunny-bright, lime-green sofa, talking about Blue Labour. He was intrigued by Maurice Glasman, the academic then giving our friends an allergic reaction. He encouraged me:

You should explore it. It’s not my thing — purpose is my thing. But politics is Hegelian — you need to reconcile the opposites. You should explore it.

By 2010, Philip had discarded the hedging and temporising that barnacles most political ideas. He didn’t have to persuade anyone any more, he could just push his ideas to adamantine clarity. He was excited about the world, technology, the defenestration of the powerful, the energy of the twenty-somethings.

Keywords

Iraq Hedging Hemel 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Philip Gould, The Unfinished Revolution (Abacus, 2011) p. 10.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    Barack Obama, Dreams from my Father (Canongate, 1995), p. 133.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    Patrick Diamond, New Labour’s Old Roots: Revisionists Thinkers in Labour’s History: 1931–1997 (Imprint Academic, 2004).Google Scholar
  4. 6.
    Caroline Benn, Keir Hardie (Hutchinson, 1992), p. 46.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© James Purnell 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Purnell

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