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Conflict Analysis and International Relations

  • Karin Aggestam
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Political Psychology Series book series (PSPP)

Abstract

Conflict analysis concerns the systematic study of the causes, actors, processes and resolution of conflicts around the globe. It draws upon a number of disciplines and strives to be conflict sensitive while generating relevant suggestions on how to manage and resolve conflict. The broad focus of conflict analysis is also reflected in the multitude of methodological approaches which are utilised (see, e.g., Druckman, 2005). This diversity partly relates to the differences in the overarching purpose of research. For instance, some studies strive to predict conflict behaviour and attitudes with the utilisation of game theory and/or simulation (Colaresi and Thompson, 2002; Maoz and Mor, 1996). Other studies aim for policy relevance and to bridge the theory-practice divide (Fisher, 2009). In such studies, structured focused comparison and/or single case studies methods are frequently used not only for theory advancement of conflict analysis, but also for generic and normative prescriptions. For instance, it may concern when and how specific conflict-resolution strategies are considered most efficient to be applied during a conflict cycle. Finally, a growing number of studies use ethnography and narrative as methods to unravel the complexities between identity politics, specific contextual features of conflict and global structures (Auerbach, 2009; Jutila et al., 2008; Nesbitt-Larking and Kinnvall, 2012). In short, the fields of research and practice of conflict analysis are vast (Monroe et al., 2009).

Keywords

Foreign Policy International Relation Belief System Restorative Justice Political Elite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Karin Aggestam 2014

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  • Karin Aggestam

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