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Lessons from the Postcolony: Frantz Fanon, Psychoanalysis and a Psychology of Political Critique

  • Ross Truscott
  • Derek Hook
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Political Psychology Series book series (PSPP)

Abstract

In this chapter, we explore some of the possibilities and dilemmas in forging a psychology of the postcolonial, placing psychoanalysis — specifically Frantz Fanon’s (1952) Black Skin, White Masks, the most explicit psychoanalytical of his works — at the centre of such a prospective form of political psychology. Fanon’s work can be taken as a founding event for a postcolonial psychology, both a point of origin and a definition of what such a field of critical praxis might entail. To be specific, it is his ambivalent relation to psychoanalysis, his repetition of its concepts — aware always of their potential to transmit, re-inscribe and reify certain ideologically loaded Eurocentric ideas — against their origins, as it were, that we want to emphasise here.1

Keywords

Standard Edition Black Skin Political Critique Critical Psychology Discursive Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ross Truscott and Derek Hook 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ross Truscott
  • Derek Hook

There are no affiliations available

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