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Narrative Constructions of Conflict and Coexistence: The Case of Bosnia-Herzegovina

  • Johanna Mannergren Selimovic
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Political Psychology Series book series (PSPP)

Abstract

It was an awkward moment. Emir and Dragan had only met in passing since the war. Now they sat in silence in Emir’s sofa, sipping glasses of juice that Emir’s wife had served. Dragan was a Bosnian Serb in the small town of Foča in southeastern Bosnia whom I had struck up an acquaintance with. He had given me a ride to the community of Ustokolina, a pleasant village on the banks of the river Drina that used to be part of Foča municipality. Today, however, the line that divides Bosnia into the two entities Republika Srpska and the Bosniak-Croat Federation meanders between Foča and Ustokolina.

Keywords

Mass Grave Moral Claim International Criminal Tribunal Ashgate Publishing Mass Atrocity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Johanna Mannergren Selimovic 2014

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  • Johanna Mannergren Selimovic

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