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Abstract

We will depart from the usual Handbook chapter format in this concluding chapter, using a looser, more discursive one. How can one briefly sum up or draw conclusions from such a large and wide-ranging book? We two, substantive Editors-in-Chief, have very different approaches, and both will be used here. Smith chose to write some brief, take-away generalizations for each part of the volume. He also assessed the substantive comprehensiveness of the Handbook, briefly suggested essential future research, and forecast future trends in relevant research. Stebbins chose a more general, qualitative approach, with which we begin here.

Keywords

Civil Society Dark Side White Collar Crime Voluntary Sector Financial Account Standard Board 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • David H. Smith
    • 1
  • Robert A. Stebbins
    • 2
  1. 1.USA
  2. 2.USA

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