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Self-Regulation in Associations

  • Christopher Corbett
  • Denise Vienne
  • Khaldoun Abou Assi
  • Harriet Namisi
  • David H. Smith

Abstract

This chapter describes various conceptions of nonprofit organization (NPO) regulation, based on theory and practice at the organizational, sector, national, and international levels.Membership Association (MA) self-regulation is seen as part of NPO regulation more generally. Governments in nearly all nations regulate MAs, especially large MAs with significant paid staff. Unregistered and/or unincorporated MAs (e.g., most local, all-volunteer, Grassroots Associations, GAs) are subject to very little government regulation, except in totalitarian dictatorships, and to lesser extent in authoritarian regimes. Most GAs and Supra-Local all-volunteer MAs exercise only minimal self-regulation in most nations. We sketch historical background and describe multi-national perspectives, including experiences in United States, the Middle East, and Africa. We also address the role of government, and identify various ways to promote MA self-regulation.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Corbett
    • 1
  • Denise Vienne
    • 2
  • Khaldoun Abou Assi
    • 3
  • Harriet Namisi
    • 4
  • David H. Smith
    • 5
  1. 1.USA
  2. 2.USA
  3. 3.Lebanon
  4. 4.Uganda
  5. 5.USA

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