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Stipended National Service Volunteering

  • Thomas A. Bryer
  • Cristian Pliscoff
  • Benjamin J. Lough
  • Ebenezer Obadare
  • David H. Smith

Abstract

Stipended national service volunteering (SNSV) is a hybrid form of volunteerism. These national/domestic government-sponsored or supported initiatives have an anti-poverty or economic development focus, providing a subsistence living allowance to volunteers working full time for one year, sometimes longer. We mainly review SNSV in specific programs in three countries as examples: VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America) in the United States, Servicio Pais in Chile, and the Nigerian National Youth Service Corps (NYSC), plus some key research elsewhere. This chapter addresses the following questions: (1) What are the substantive policy or quality of life areas of focus for SNSV? (2) What financial or non-material support is provided to the volunteers? (3) Who pays for the material/financial support provided to the volunteers? (4) Who volunteers for SNSV programs? What motivates and triggers individual involvement? (5) What are the known impacts in society resulting from SNSV programs?

SNSV is similar to but also contrasts with stipended transnational full-time service volunteering (stipended transnational volunteering/STV), as reviewed in Handbook Chapter 10.

Keywords

Civil Society Underserved Community National Service Young Professional Corps Member 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s) 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas A. Bryer
    • 1
  • Cristian Pliscoff
    • 2
  • Benjamin J. Lough
    • 3
  • Ebenezer Obadare
    • 4
  • David H. Smith
    • 5
  1. 1.USA
  2. 2.Chile
  3. 3.USA
  4. 4.Nigeria
  5. 5.USA

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