Feminist Criticism and Gulliver’s Travels

  • Jonathan Swift
Part of the Case Studies in Contemporary Criticism book series (CSICC)

Abstract

Feminist criticism comes in many forms, and feminist critics have a variety of goals. Some are interested in rediscovering the works of women writers overlooked by a masculine-dominated culture. Others have revisited books by male authors and reviewed them from a woman’s point of view to understand how they both reflect and shape the attitudes that have held women back.

Keywords

Coherence Posit Straw Kelly Dura 

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Feminist Criticism: A Selected Bibliography French Feminist Theories

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Copyright information

© Bedford Books of St. Martin’s Press 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Swift

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