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The Return of the Goddess

Femininity and Divine Leadership
  • Beverly Metcalfe

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with becoming, specifically feminine becoming. By “becoming,” I mean towards a state of transcendence beyond dominant masculinist knowledge, allowing all human beings to take their place as embodied living subjects in their own right, and without recourse to dualistic constructions of sex/gender. Drawing on the poststructuralist writings of Irigaray and the Divine, and feminist scholars I show how a rereading of feminine wisdom and leadership can help us move towards a location of transcendence, and to become sexed subjectivities. The investigation of feminine becoming will not draw on contemporary female leaders, but heroines in the tales of human morality and spirituality contained within the Hebrew Bible. Focusing specifically on Deborah in the Book of Judges, one of the earliest recorded female leaders, the aim is to contribute to a process of reimagining new readings of ancient leadership knowledges so as to further advance leadership theorizing by inscribing a feminine logic.

Keywords

Feminist Scholar Emphasis Original Feminist Research Female Leader Biblical Text 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Gillian Howie and J’annine Jobling 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Beverly Metcalfe

There are no affiliations available

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