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Transcendence and Feminist Philosophy

On Avoiding Apotheosis
  • Pamela Sue Anderson

Abstract

This chapter intends to treat the title Women and the Divine: Touching Transcendence as a philosophical topic, offering one response to Luce Irigaray’s “Toward a Divine in the Feminine” (Chapter 1 in this volume), while also drawing from her “Divine Women” and “I Love to You.” I would like to raise a critical question for my readers: Can Irigaray, or those who follow her, avoid the ethically debilitating forms of transcendence-in-immanence that Simone de Beauvoir successfully uncovers in the immanence of the female narcissist, lover, and mystic?

Keywords

Sexual Difference Natural Kind Female Body Gender Type Feminist Philosophy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Gillian Howie and J’annine Jobling 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pamela Sue Anderson

There are no affiliations available

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