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The “Independent Media”

  • Nicholas Daniloff

Abstract

For seven decades, Moscow imposed a high degree of uniformity on the Soviet media by using a rigid censorship system, KGB intimidation, and, most importantly, widespread self-censorship inspired by fear. Now that these factors have largely disappeared from Russian life, it is reasonable to expect that diversity and independence will be the rule for newspapers and broadcasting in the future. But can we be sure?

Keywords

Press Freedom Free Press Independent Medium Christian Science Monitor Central Television 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Note

  1. 6.
    Vladimir Vesinsky, “Moscow During the Abortive Coup,” Nieman Reports (Harvard University) 45, no. 4 (Winter 1991), p. 31.Google Scholar
  2. 8.
    Yelena Zelinskaya, “Leningrad Publication’s Resistance,” Nieman Reports (Harvard University) 45, no. 4 (Winter 1991), p. 31.Google Scholar
  3. 12.
    Stuart Loory and Ann Imse, Seven Days that Shook the World (Atlanta: Turner Publishing, Inc., 1991), pp. 99–102.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Institute for the Study of Conflict, Ideology & Policy 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nicholas Daniloff

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