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Security Through Development?

  • W. Scott Thompson

Abstract

Development and security have been the purported goals of every third world state since the onset of the era of independence following World War II, as we have already argued. True, there have been other underlying goals, some perhaps more pervasive (for example, the search for power on the part of élites or ethnic factions), others less so, usually classifiable, however, as subsets of our twin study (for example, education). And these two subjects have dominated the literature in their separate incarnations. Recently, the relationship and possible interdependence of these two variables have come under scrutiny, and in this chapter we see how some of this bears on Philippine politics. Most of what has been done is cross-national, and valuable. Here we have a single case study with the detail such affords, a country where the issue of security and development is central to survival in the present period.

Keywords

Foreign Affair Land Reform Agrarian Reform Security Consideration Quezon City 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    Richard J. Kessler, Rebellion and Repression in the Philippines (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1989).Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    Ateneo de Manila University, Public Opinion Survey August 1989 (Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University, 1989), Table 8, p. 36. Hereafter Ateneo Survey. Explanation pertaining to table quoted above: Roughly, A class is the rich élite, B and C are the middle classes, D is the lower-middle class, and E is the proletariatGoogle Scholar
  3. 43.
    Lucy Komisar, Corazon Aquino: The Story of a Revolution (New York: George Braziller, 1988), p. 181.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© W. Scott Thompson 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. Scott Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.Fletcher School of Law and DiplomacyUSA

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