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Baby Boom to Generation X: Progress in Young Women’s Health

  • Alina Salganicoff
  • Barbara Wentworth
  • Liberty Greene

Abstract

Overall, the health profile of young women today shows that significant gains have been made over the last 25 years—and that there is still much room for improvement. Changes in national policy, advances in science and medical research, and important shifts in culture and society have had a profound influence on women’s health and access to care. This chapter examines the health and well-being of women age 25–34 today and discusses how these factors have changed over the last generation. Key findings from the chapter include:
  • In the past 25 years, the share of young women with high cholesterol or hypertension has fallen, but the share of those who are overweight or obese has risen. Fewer than half of young women in the United States participate in regular physical activity and get adequate nutrition.

  • Mental health conditions that disproportionately affect young women include major and postpartum depression, anxiety, and eating disorders. An estimated one in five women will experience a period of major depression in her lifetime, while an estimated one percent will be affected by anorexia nervosa and an estimated one to three percent will be affected by bulimia nervosa.

  • Compared to 25 years ago, women today delay marriage and childbearing but initiate sexual activity earlier and have more sexual partners over the course of their lives.

Keywords

Black Woman Prenatal Care Hispanic Woman Baby Boom Abortion Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Women’s Research and Education Institute 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alina Salganicoff
  • Barbara Wentworth
  • Liberty Greene

There are no affiliations available

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