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Elections and Officials

  • Cynthia B. Costello
  • Vanessa R. Wight
  • Anne J. Stone

Abstract

Nearly eight million more women than men voted in the presidential election of 2000, the tenth consecutive four-year election in which women outnumbered men at the polls. Women’s predominance in the electorate may not be surprising, since women outnumber men in the U.S. population. However, not only are the majority of U.S. voters female, but women are more likely than men to vote.

Keywords

Presidential Election Democratic Candidate Republican Candidate Exit Poll Federal Judgeship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Women’s Research and Education Institute 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia B. Costello
    • 1
  • Vanessa R. Wight
    • 1
  • Anne J. Stone
    • 1
  1. 1.Women’s Research and Education InstituteUSA

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