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Economic Security

  • Cynthia B. Costello
  • Vanessa R. Wight
  • Anne J. Stone

Abstract

The last five years of the twentieth century saw income gains for families of every type even after taking inflation into account. Still, in 2000 as in earlier years, married couples with working wives (most are two-earner couples) continued to have by far the highest incomes. There were significant differences in median family income by race and Hispanic origin, with Asian/Pacific Islander couples and non-Hispanic white couples having substantially higher median incomes than black couples and Hispanic couples (who had the lowest incomes of all couples). Families headed by women had by far the lowest incomes overall.

Keywords

Poverty Rate Personal Income Married Couple Current Population Survey Economic Security 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Women’s Research and Education Institute 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia B. Costello
    • 1
  • Vanessa R. Wight
    • 1
  • Anne J. Stone
    • 1
  1. 1.Women’s Research and Education InstituteUSA

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