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Earnings and Benefits

  • Cynthia B. Costello
  • Vanessa R. Wight
  • Anne J. Stone

Abstract

This section uses two measures of earnings: the median weekly earnings of full-time workers and the median annual earnings of full-time workers who worked year round. By either measure, and taking inflation into account, the earnings of America’s working women have been increasing. However, black women continue to earn considerably less than Asian/Pacific Islander and white women do, and Hispanic women have the lowest earnings of all.

Keywords

Health Insurance Coverage Hispanic Woman Current Population Survey Pension Plan Woman Worker 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Women’s Research and Education Institute 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia B. Costello
    • 1
  • Vanessa R. Wight
    • 1
  • Anne J. Stone
    • 1
  1. 1.Women’s Research and Education InstituteUSA

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