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Employment

  • Cynthia B. Costello
  • Vanessa R. Wight
  • Anne J. Stone

Abstract

Women’s steadily increasing commitment to the paid labor force and to full-time work is certainly one of the biggest, longest-running, and most important stories in recent American history—a story warranting the 26 tables and figures devoted to it here.

Keywords

Black Woman American Woman Labor Force Participation Hispanic Woman Current Population Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Women’s Research and Education Institute 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cynthia B. Costello
    • 1
  • Vanessa R. Wight
    • 1
  • Anne J. Stone
    • 1
  1. 1.Women’s Research and Education InstituteUSA

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